Captain, President, Governor and Secretary Will Emery

PHOTO BY REGAN MCCROSKEY
PHOTO BY REGAN MCCROSKEY

BY REGAN MCCROSKEY (’15)

“I figured out early on that if you want to succeed as a leader, you have to be constantly expanding what you know,” senior Will Emery said.

As a man of boundless power, Emery is soaring on the endless possibilities of furthering his education and a career in government.

“Something shadowy in the upper echelons of the government where I can go to work via helicopter,” Emery said. “Or Law. One of the two.”

He is involved in a very extensive list of clubs and organizations, including leadership positions in almost all of them.

“I’m the Captain of the Mock Trial team and the Academic team, President of our local YiG Chapter, Governor of the state Youth in Government, co-Consul of the Latin Club, President of NHS, Secretary of the Drama Club, and the President of the Ohio Junior Classical League, aka the OJCL,” Emery said.

Leadership is Emery’s golden calling. He spends much of his time giving back to his community and helping others with the knowledge he has gained over the years.

“I’ve learned that Lowes really had it right when they said ‘Never Stop Improving.'”

Not only is he the front-runner of many organizations, he also teaches a robotics class for young children.

“People pay me to teach their kids how to play with advanced Legos,” Emery said. ” How cool is that?”

He devotes most of his time to the groups he is a part of, but loves every minute

“There are few better feelings in the world than putting time and effort into programs, whether they are service projects or theatre productions, and watching them come into fruition,” Emery said.

He also has a very different talent: he is fluent in Ubbi Dubbi, a made-up language spoken on the PBS TV show “Zoom.”

“When I was really little, my sister and I watched a ton of the show Zoom, and they would always have a skit or two in Ubbi Dubbi,” Emery said. “So after a few weeks of rigorous immersion, we picked up the language. Having a language you can speak with just your sibling is endlessly beneficial. On those occasions when we were confronted by our parents we could make a quick consultation in Ubbi Dubbi and get our stories strait, away from the prying ears.”

As for the hardest class he’s ever taken, Emery was quick to respond: “IAP. That says it all.”

Because of Emery’s well-rounded background, he will be applying to some very selective colleges and universities.

“I’m casting a wide net and I’d be thrilled to attend any of them.”

Emery also expressed his hopes and his fears.

“My main hope is that I can represent myself in such a way that I’m admitted,” Emery said. “I’ve always been a little concerned I’ll have a glaring typo in an application.”